The Names of Launceston



The European discovery of the Launceston area and the Tamar Valley dates back to 1798 when Bass and Flinders were sent to explore the possibility that there existed a strait between the great continent and Van Diemen's Land. They named their landing place Port Dalrymple. Settlement of the area began in 1804 when Lt. Col. William Paterson and his party set up camp where George Town now stands and formally took possession of Port Dalrymple. A few weeks later, the settlement was moved across the river to York Town, and a year later they finally settled in Launceston.



Launceston


Following settlement by Lieutenant Colonel William Paterson in 1806, Launceston was called Patersonia for a short time. Paterson, the founder and first commandant, changed it to Launceston in honour of Governor Philip Gidley King whose birthplace was the Cornish township of Launceston. This was the beginning of a long association between the new Launceston and the ancient English township. Launceston is bounded by the North Esk River in the north, the suburb of Newstead, Broadland Park, generally by Cypress Street, Elphin Road, York Street, My Street, Welman Street and High Street in the east, Howick Street in the south, and generally by Church Street, Upton Street, Bourke Street, Zig Zag Reserve and the Tamar River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s when a military town was set up, with land initially used for wheat farming, then sheep grazing. Population was minimal until the 1820s, when the city developed as a commercial, industrial and service hub for Tasmania. Rapid growth took place during the late 1800s, largely due to the mining boom in the 1870s and 1880s. Growth continued during the early 1900s and the post-war years. The population declined slightly during the early 1990s, and then increased gradually from the mid 1990s.

Major features of the area include the Launceston CBD (including Brisbane Street Mall, Civic Square and Quadrant Mall), Launceston Plaza, Tasmanian Polytechnic (Drysdale North, Launceston City and Wellington Square Campuses), Launceston General Hospital, Calvary Health Care St Vincent's Campus, Boag's Brewery, Design Centre Tasmania, National Automobile Museum of Tasmania, Queen Victoria Art Gallery, Albert Hall, Earl Arts Centre, Princess Theatre, Launceston Town Hall, Tamar River Cruises, Old Launceston Seaport, Ritchies Mill Historic Site, Paterson Barracks, Elphin Sports Centre, NTCA Ground, Launceston Indoor Sports Arena, Brickfields Reserve, City Park, King s Park, Ockerby Gardens, Royal Park, Prince s Square and two schools.

Trevallyn


The suburb takes its name from the property of an early settler, William Barnes (1790-1848). Trevallyn is bounded by the West Tamar Council area in the north and west, the Tamar River in the east, and the South Esk River in the south. Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming. Population was minimal until the 1880s and 1890s. Trevallyn became known as the Captain's suburb. In the 19th Century the professional classes would live on the hill overlooking Launceston's harbour and walk to their ships or workplaces in the CBD. In 1915, trams begin running to Trevallyn, sharing Kings Bridge with cars. Rapid development took place during the 1950s and 1960s. The population declined slightly between 1991 and 2006, and then increased slightly between 2006 and 2011.

Major features of the area include Cataract Gorge Reserve (including Gorge Cliffgrounds and Basin Chairlift), Trevallyn Park, Trevallyn Reserve and one school.

The name of the suburb spelled backwards, Nyllavert, can be found on postal records and lists of localities; the local post office used to carry this name in the 1930s. Despite the place name no longer existing and not being officially gazetted, the name still appears in many lists and indexes of localities. Walking through here is a delight to those interested in Victorian domestic architecture.

It was the suburb in which Sir Benjamin Gill OAM called home while he lived at his home in Whitford Grove. The novelist, Katharine Susannah Prichard, lived there as a child.

Riverside


An outer north western suburb of Launceston. Situated chiefly on the eastern side of the West Tamar Highway. It is bordered by the Tamar River which is a marshy area. Riverside West is on the western side of the West Tamar Highway. Formerly know as Marawaylee it was renamed Riverside West in 1960 when the land was subdivided and sold as a housing estate.

Invermay


Invermay was not originally reserved as a town site. areas were therefore granted by the Crown in fairly large blocks. The town was proclaimed in May 1896 and was included in Greater Launceston in 1907. Invermay contains the minor suburb of Inveresk, it is located on the eastern side of the Tamar River and the northern side of the North Esk River. The suburb is most notable as being home to York Park (Aurora Stadium). Invermay is bounded by the suburb of Mowbray and Churchill Park Sports Complex in the north, the North Esk River in the east and south, and the Tamar River in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, although population was minimal until the late 1800s when the railway yards were built. Rapid development took place during the 1880s and 1890s, with growth continuing during the early 1900s. Expansion continued during the post-war years. The population generally declined slightly from the early 1990s. Major features of the area include Churchill Park Sports Complex (including the Heritage Forest), Aurora Stadium (York Park), Queen Victoria Museum, Queen Victoria Planetarium, Launceston Tramway Museum, The Tramsheds Function Centre, Tasmanian Polytechnic (Inveresk Campus), Caledonia Square, Invermay Park, Ogilvie Park and two schools.

Invermay and a portion of the Launceston CBD are situated on the natural floodplain at the confluence of the Tamar River estuary and the North and South Esk Rivers. Much of Invermay is below the high tide level and is reliant upon levees for its sustainability. In April 1929, the worst flood in Tasmanian history hit the Launceston area, lasting several days. Two suspension bridges over the Gorge were swept away. Invermay was devastated and 4000 people were made homeless in just one night. Two thousand homes and buildings were damaged or washed away.

Newstead


Newstead is named afterNewstead House, a homestead which was built in the area and named by Ronald Campbell Gunn in 1855. The name of the Post Office in Newstead was changed in 1919 to Kawalla and was not renamed to Newstead until 1961. Newstead is bounded by the suburb of Launceston in the north, the North Esk River and Scotch Oakburn Park in the east, the suburb of Norwood, Punchbowl Reserve and the suburb of South Launceston in the south, and David Street, Malabar Street, Cardigan Street, Lanoma Street, Erina Street and the suburb of East Launceston in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Population was minimal until the late 1800s, with gradual growth through to the early 1900s. Expansion continued during the post-war years. The population declined slightly during the 1990s, and then increased gradually between 2001 and 2011 as new dwellings were added to the area. Major features of the area include Hoblers Bridge Reserve, Tasmania Netball Centre, Eastman Sports Oval, Newstead Reserve, Scotch Oakburn Park, Launceston Police & Community Youth Club, Newstead Shopping Centre and numerous private and public schools.

Ravenswood


A north eastern suburb of Launceston, Ravenswood is situated on the eastern side of the North Esk River. A creek that flows through the suburb is Distillery Creek. This was named because of a distillery built there in 1824 by James Tower. This distillery was in the area where Ravenswood is today. Ravenswood is thought to be named after an early property in the area. For many years the area was known as Ravenna.

Ravenswood is bounded by the localities of Mowbray and Rocherlea in the north, the locality of Nunamara in the east, the locality of Waverley in the south, and the North Esk River in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming. Population was minimal until the post-war years. Rapid growth took place between the 1950s and the 1980s, including the construction of public housing. The population declined during the 1990s, and then was relatively stable between 2001 and 2011, a result of little change in dwelling stock. Major features of the area include Ravenswood Bushland Park, Vermont Road Bushland Park, Zions Hill, Ravenswood Community Park, Eastwood Shopping Centre and one school.

Punchbowl


A south eastern suburb of Launceston, a popular attraction of which is the Punch Bowl Reserve. The reserve has exotic and native trees and rhododendrons set in semi-natural bushland. It was opened up in the early 1900s and called Devils Punch Bowl.

Norwood


Norwood is bounded by the suburb of Newstead and Scotch Oakburn Park in the north, the North Esk River in the north-east and east, St Leonards Park, Glenwood Road, Opossum Road and the suburb of Kings Meadow in the south, and Carr Villa Flora Reserve, Launceston Golf Club and Punchbowl Reserve in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, although population was minimal until the late 1800s. Rapid development took place from the post-war years into the late 1960s. The population fluctuated slightly from the early 1990s, a result of small changes in dwelling stock and the average number of persons living in each dwelling. Major features of the area include Queechy Park, Charlton Street Reserve and two schools.

Queechy


The minor suburb of Queechy is also included as part of Norwood. The area was opened up for development in the 1960s with considerable growth in the 1970s to 1980s and contains a mix of large, older-style family homes with patches of more modern homes, mostly in the central-eastern portion of the suburb. Norwood is located on a 60-80m high, relatively flat-topped alluvial plateau with the valley of the North Esk River to the east, the Punchbowl Reserve to the north and the Carr Villa Flora Reserve, Carr Villa Cemetery and the Kings Meadows Golf Course to the west.

Kings Meadow


The name is taken from an early farm owned by Philip Oakden, which was named after Colonial Governor of NSW, Phillip Gidley King. Kings Meadows - Punchbowl is bounded by the suburb of South Launceston and Punchbowl Reserve in the north, Norwood Avenue, Launceston Golf Club, Carr Villa Flora Reserve and the suburb of Norwood in the east, the suburb of Youngtown and Kings Meadows Link in the south, and the Midland Highway, the suburb of Prospect and generally by Gascoyne Street and Punchbowl Road in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Some growth took place during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Significant development did not occur until the post-war years, with growth particularly during the 1950s and 1960s. The population has been relatively stable since the early 1990s, generally a result of some new dwellings being added to the area, but a decline in the average number of persons living in each dwelling.


Rocherlea


Rocherlea is named after former Town Clerk Rocher. Rocherlea is bounded by the locality of Underwood in the north, the locality of Nunamara in the east, the localities of Ravenswood, Mowbray, Mayfield and Newnham in the south, and the East Tamar Highway and the locality of Dilston in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for grazing. The most significant development occurred between the 1950s and 1980s, including public housing construction. The population declined gradually from the early 1990s, a result of relative stability in dwelling stock and a decline in the average number of persons living in each dwelling. Major features of the area include Rocherlea Recreation Ground, Rocherlea Oval and one school.

Legana


A small township on the Tamar River in northern Tasmania. The name Legana is based on the Aboriginal word for fresh water since it is at the point where the Tamar River becomes fresh water. There is currently a homestead called Freshwater which was adjacent to a private jetty where early settlers traded with the local natives. This homestead, in Nobelius Drive, now operates as a Bed and Breakfast accommodation house.

Legana was originally a rural town made up of dairy farms, apple orchards, and cattle grazing. Most of the residences were originally located near the Tamar River with housing developments built nearer to the West Tamar Highway. Legana was also originally called Legana Estate.

Rosevears


A farming district in the West Tamar area, it was named after a family who settled there in the early days of the colony. William Henry Rosevear arrived in Tasmania from the colony at Swan River (Perth, Western Australia) with his wife and children in 1829. He had spent most of his working life as a farmer in Cornwall, England, and, in view of his experience on the land, was granted land in the West Tamar. Rosevear was also a publican, holding the licence of the Half Way House between 1833 and 1834, and later, the Rose Inn. It trades today as the Rosevear Waterfront Tavern. The village was originally established a ship building port and there is a plaque on the water's edge where the Rebecca, the boat which carried John Batman across Bass Strait in 1835 and led to the creation of Melbourne, was built. A few kilometres west of Rosevears on the West Tamar Highway is Brady's Lookout. It is a delightful irony that this rocky outcrop, once used by the bushranger Matthew Brady to spy on possible victims on the road below, is now a panoramic lookout across the Tamar Valley complete with picnic and toilet facilities.

Grindelwald


A small Swiss-style Village inspired town developed just north of Launceston by a Dutch immigrant to Tasmania, Roelf Vos, after he sold his supermarket chain to Woolworths. It is named after the Swiss village of Grindelwald in the canton of Bern in Switzerland. Grindelwald was built around an artificial lake, on the edge of which sits the 40 hectare Tamar Valley Resort, which shares the Swiss architectural style. The suburb was begun in 1980, and the resort opened in 1989. In the 1990s, the town expanded with a new suburb named Pleasant Hills, though not in keeping with the swiss theme.

East Launceston


East Launceston is named to describe its location - to the east of Launceston, which was named after a Cornish township. East Launceston is bounded by York Street, the suburb of Launceston and generally by Elphin Road in the north, the suburb of Newstead, Trotsford Crescent, generally by Lanoma Street, Suffolk Street and Cardigan Street in the east, Malabar Street and David Street in the south, and generally by High Street, Welman Street and My Street in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Rapid growth took place during the late 1800s and early 1900s, largely due to the mining boom. Expansion continued from the post-war years. The population declined slightly from the early 1990s, generally a result of dwelling stock loss and a decline in dwelling occupancy rates.

Major features of the area include Launceston Aquatic Centre, Windmill Hill Reserve, St George's Square, Calvary Health Care St Luke's Campus and two schools.

West Launceston


West Launceston is named to describe its location - to the west of Launceston, which was named after a Cornish township. West Launceston is bounded by the suburb of Launceston in the north, the suburb of South Launceston and the Midland Highway in the east, the suburb of Prospect, Cambridge Street, Outram Street and the suburb of Summerhill in the south, and the South Esk River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, although population was minimal until the 1870s. Rapid growth took place during the late 1800s, continuing into the early 1900s. Expansion continued during the post-war years. The population has been relatively stable since the early 1990s, a result of some new dwellings being added to the area, but a decline in the average number of persons living in each dwelling. Major features of the area include Cataract Gorge Reserve (including Basin Pool), Zig Zag Reserve, Arbour Park, Woods Reserve and one school.

South Launceston


South Launceston is named to describe its location - to the south of Launceston, which was named after a Cornish township. South Launceston is bounded generally by Howick Street in the north, the suburbs of Newstead and Punchbowl in the east, generally by Punchbowl Road, Gascoyne Street, Caroline Street and Westbury Road in the south, and the Midland Highway and the suburb of West Launceston in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, although population was minimal until the 1870s. Rapid growth took place from the late 1800s through to the early 1900s. Expansion continued during the post-war years. The population declined during the 1990s, and then increased marginally between 2001 and 2011 as some new dwellings were added to the area. Major features of the area include Launceston Transport and Road Safety Centre, Coronation Park, Glen Dhu Sportsground, Rose Lane Park and two schools.

Windemere


Windermere - Swan Bay and District is bounded by the George Town Council area in the north, the localities of Lower Turners Marsh, Karoola, Turners Marsh and Underwood in the east, the locality of Rocherlea, the East Tamar Highway and the locality of Newnham in the south, and the Tamar River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for grazing. Some growth took place from the 1950s. The population declined during the late 1990s, and then increased between 2001 and 2011 as new dwellings were added to the area. This small area includes the localities of Dilston, Swan Bay and Windermere, and the Launceston City Council area part of the locality of Mount Direction. St Matthias Anglican Church, at Windermere, is one of Tasmania's most beautiful heritage listed churches.

Breadalbane


A township approximately 13 kilometres south of Launceston. Breadalbane Plains was named by Governor Macquarie after the Earl of Breadalbane, his wife's cousin. Breadalbane is a Highland district in Perthshire, Scotland. The district has also been known as Cocked Hat, The Springs and Brumby's Plain, the latter being its name at the time Macquarie first came through the area and renamed it. In days gone by it was situated on the Launceston to Hobart highway. Breadalbane was proclaimed as a town in 1866.

The Breadalbane area was notorious in the early 19th century for sheep stealing. In the colonial days there were three inns at Breadalbane, The Albion, The Temperance Hotel, and The Woolpack Inn (today, only the Woolpack Inn still stands). Today, there is an important roundabout at Breadalbane at the entrance to the city of Launceston, and Launceston Airport.

South Esk


A region in northern Tasmania south of Launceston through which the South Esk River flows. It incorporates townships such as Evandale, Perth and Longford. In the early 1800s, when the area was first opened up for farming, the South Esk River and the areas around it were also known as New River. The South Esk River is the longest river in Tasmania. The river was named by Colonel William Paterson in December 1804 after the River Esk in Lothian, Scotland. Paterson was a Scotsman.

It starts in the eastern foothills of the Ben Lomond plateau near Mathinna and arcs around the entire southern promontory of the mountain - passing through Fingal, flowing through Avoca and Evandale before wending its way northwest through Longford and Hadspen. The river finally meets the Meander River and flows through the Cataract Gorge to meet the North-Esk river at Launceston. The river is dammed at Trevallyn Dam near Launceston and used for the city's Hydro Electricity scheme. The river is constantly subject to flooding and overflows at Lake Trevallyn cause a scenic display of rapids gushing through the Gorge.

Tamar Valley


The Tamar River is a 70 km estuarine in northern Tasmania formed by the merging of the North Esk River and South Esk Rivers at Launceston (the largest settlement) to its mouth at Low Head. It was named by Colonel William Paterson in December 1804 for the River Tamar in Great Britain which passes Launceston, Cornwall. Despite its name it is not actually a river as it is saline and tidal over its entire length.

The Tamar River estuary is 70 kilometres long extending south from Bass Straight to where Launceston is located at its upper reaches. It is described as a flooded river valley being inundated during the last post glacial transgression that occurred between 13,500 to 6,500 years ago.

The two major tributaries of the Tamar River estuary are the South Esk and North Esk Rivers. The catchment of these two rivers amount to over 10,000 km2, being approximately one sixth of the land mass of Tasmania. The South Esk is the longest river in Tasmania (252km) and is the main source of fresh water to the estuary.

Elphin


A small eastern locality of Launceston around Elphin Road. The name is taken from Elphin Farm once established there by Richard Dry. It was named after Elphin village in County Roscommon, Ireland.


St Leonards-White Hills


White Hills was thought to be named to describe the area during early settlement where flocks of white cockatoos covered the ground, eating the grain that had been sown. St Leonards - Waverley - White Hills is bounded by the locality of Ravenswood in the north, the localities of Nunamara and Blessington in the east, the Northern Midlands Council area in the south, and the North Esk River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for grazing. Population was minimal until the late 1800s. Significant development did not occur until the post-war years, with growth particularly during the 1950s and 1960s. The population declined slightly between 1991 and 2006, and then increased slightly between 2006 and 2011 as new dwellings were added to the area. Major features of the area include St Leonards Sports Centre, St Leonards Athletic Centre, St Leonards Hockey Centre, Northern Indoor Sports, St Leonards Picnic Ground, Chimney Saddle Reservoir and several schools.

Waverley


An eastern Launceston suburb made famous by the woollen mills after which it is named. St Leonards - Waverley - White Hills is bounded by the locality of Ravenswood in the north, the localities of Nunamara and Blessington in the east, the Northern Midlands Council area in the south, and the North Esk River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for grazing. Population was minimal until the late 1800s. Significant development did not occur until the post-war years, with growth particularly during the 1950s and 1960s. The population declined slightly between 1991 and 2006, and then increased slightly between 2006 and 2011 as new dwellings were added to the area. Major features of the area include Waverley Woollen Mills, Northern Indoor Sports, Waverley Lake, Chimney Saddle Reservoir and several schools.

Ravenswood


The Ravenswood district took its name from the property owned by David McGown on Distillery Creek. Ravenswood was first settled in the early nineteenth century as a small farming area. The first official valuation of properties in the district took place in 1858. As well as already obtaining grants of land from the Government, Mr McGown purchased 2000 acres and another 30 acres at Distillery Creek from Henry Prialux, the original grantee, in February, 1836, for the sum of two thousand pounds. He called his property at Distillery Creek "Ravenswood". Later he named the area near his home "Roslyn". His first home on the property was, unfortunately, burnt. Ultimately the district became known as Ravenswood.

According to one source, two of the best known early settlers were the Towse brothers, who emigrated from England. It has been suggested that their property was named "Ravenswood", after their property in their homeland but Archives did not reveal any evidence to substantiate this.

Mowbray


The name "Mowbray" was adopted from an early homestead property formerly located within what is now the Church Grammar School, it was named and owned by Martin Mowbray Stephenson. The Mowbray Racecourse was a substantial part of this property, and racing meets have been held there from as early as 1830. The name itself stems back to Normandy in France and literally means 'mud hill'.

Mowbray is bounded by the suburb of Mayfield, Parklands Parade and Mowbray Golf Club in the north, the locality of Rocherlea in the east, the suburb of Ravenswood, the North Esk River and Churchill Park Sports Complex in the south, and the Tamar River in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the 1820s, with land used mainly for farming. Population was minimal until the late 1800s when rapid growth occurred, largely due to the mining boom. Further growth took place during the early 1900s and the post-war years. The population fluctuated between 1991 and 2006, and then increased between 2006 and 2011 as new dwellings were added to the area. Major features of the area include Mowbray Golf Club, Mowbray Racecourse, Mowbray Marketplace, Pine Tree Reserve and two schools.

Mowbray Heights


The suburb of Mowbray Heights is situated on the elevated, northern side of Mowbray. The Newnham Creek flows through the Mowbray Golf Course on its way to the Tamar River. The industrial district of Remount is also included as part of Mowbray and contains an Amcor cardboard factory and the Launceston City Council quarries and waste disposal area.

Vermont


The minor suburb of Vermont, located on a small off-shoot hill, is now a declassified suburb but has a history dating back to the early 19th century. The name Vermont (meaning 'green hills' in French) was given to the whole area of Mowbray in about 1823 by William Effingham Lawrence, a famous Tasmanian pioneer and colonist. William Effingham Lawrence had convicts erect blue stone walls on the property which separated the land into paddocks, the stone was quarried from a nearby creek bed and from a small quarry a short distance away. The remains of this quarrying can still be seen in both places. Convicts were also used to drain the river flat paddocks which were subject to regular flooding as the property fronts on the North Esk River.

In the late 1840s, Vermont Homestead was held up by the Bushranger James Britton and his gang. He was said to have died at Leven 15 years before this event. The occupants of the house were bound by the wrists and made to stay in the front room of the house. A visiting farmer, John Lamont of the nearby 'Braemar' farm (c. 1825), was caught up in the holdup whilst visiting the family to play for them the bagpipes. He untied himself and secured a hammer, but the Bushrangers left before he could make use of it.

Newham - Mayfield


Newnham is located on the East Tamar Highway, on the eastern side of the Tamar River. Newnham - Mayfield is bounded by the localities of Dilston and Rocherlea in the north, the Launceston-Bell Bay railway line and the Mowbray Golf Club in the east, the suburb of Mowbray in the south, and the Tamar River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Population was minimal until the post-war years. Rapid growth took place from the late 1940s into the late 1960s, including the construction of public housing in Mayfield. The population increased gradually from the mid 1990s, a result of new dwellings being added to the area. Major features of the area include the University of Tasmania (Newnham Campus), Australian Maritime College, Tasmanian Polytechnic (Alanvale Campus), University Sports Centre, Mount Stuart Park and several schools.

Summerhill


Summerhill derives its name from an early property, which later was used for a Baptist Church in the area. Summerhill - Prospect is bounded by the suburb of West Launceston, Cambridge Street and Peel Street in the north, the Midland Highway, Westbury Road, Caroline Street and the suburb of Kings Meadows in the east, the Midland Highway and the Northern Midlands Council area in the south, and the Meander Valley Council area and the South Esk River in the west.

Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with some growth in the late 1800s. Significant development did not occur until the 1950s. The population fluctuated slightly during the 1990s, and then was relatively stable between 2001 and 2011, a result of few new dwellings being added to the area and a decline in the average number of persons living in each dwelling.

Prospect


Settlement of the area dates from the early 1800s, with some growth in the late 1800s. Significant development did not occur until the 1950s. The population fluctuated slightly during the 1990s, and then was relatively stable between 2001 and 2011, a result of few new dwellings being added to the area and a decline in the average number of persons living in each dwelling. Major features of the area include Silverdome, Kate Reed Nature Recreation Area, West Launceston Park and two schools.

Blackstone Heights


Blackstone Heights consists of four major roads, (Blackstone Road, Kelsy Road, Panorama Road, and Longvista Road) in a loop about 7 kilometres (4.3 mi) in total. The loop is connected by Pitcher Parade which originates from near the Country Club Casino and is the only entrance to Blackstone Heights.

Youngtown


Formerly known as Young Town, it is thought to be named after Governor Sir Henry Fox Young. Youngtown - Relbia is bounded by Kings Meadows Link, the suburb of Kings Meadows, Opossum Road, Glenwood Road and the suburb of Norwood in the north, the North Esk River in the east, the Northern Midlands Council area in the south, and the Midland Highway in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the 1830s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Some growth took place during the late 1800s. Population was minimal until the post-war years. The population increased substantially from the mid 1990s as new dwellings were added to the area.

Major features of the area include Youngtown Regional Park, Bluegum Park, Miami Park, Youngtown Memorial Park, Franklin House, several wineries/vineyards and one school.

Relbia


Relbia is named from an Aboriginal word meaning "a long way". Youngtown - Relbia is bounded by Kings Meadows Link, the suburb of Kings Meadows, Opossum Road, Glenwood Road and the suburb of Norwood in the north, the North Esk River in the east, the Northern Midlands Council area in the south, and the Midland Highway in the west. Settlement of the area dates from the 1830s, with land used mainly for farming and grazing. Some growth took place during the late 1800s. Population was minimal until the post-war years. The population increased substantially from the mid 1990s as new dwellings were added to the area.